Self-Promotion Recommendations

Self-Promotion Recommendations

If you have checked out my website, you have probably gathered I have been in the Internet Marketing business for a while (over a dozen years now). I’ve been managing Google AdWords for as long, writing ad copy, creating media including video and hosting blogs with all the trappings of social media to help promote my clients’ products and services. Also, I have written a couple books including one on Internet Marketing.

Writing and self-publishing is an awesome self-promotion tool. It says to you that I know enough to write a book and that’s often enough to impress people–especially when you go to an interview or meeting with your book for them to leaf through while you talk.

Getting a degree from a college is also a form of self-promotion. Having a title or certification is another way. These look great on your office wall.

I always recommend self-promotion of all kinds for my clients.

I have an announcement to make. I have found another form of self-promotion that I have thoroughly investigated and found that it is not only a valid type of self-promotion, but one that is immediate and lasting.

First, let me tell you about the immediate benefit. If you are listed in Stanford Who’s Who, you can obtain their directory showing listings of all their members. Put this in your lobby or place where your clients can thumb through magazines while they wait. When they get to your office, make sure to show your plaque displaying your acceptance into the ranks of Stanford Who’s Who.

As far as a lasting benefit, there is an online network where you can meet other members, advertise yourself and be found by search. You can expand your circle of friends and acquaintances this way and find experts who can help you or even provide your service or product to others in the network.

You may have been contacted by Stanford Who’s Who for inclusion in their directory and, if so, consider this to be just as valuable as writing and publishing your own book. How much would you pay for that? Think about the expense of getting a college or university degree and the cost of that. If you can put value on what people think when you tell them or show them you are listed in Stanford Who’s Who, then weight that against what you are willing to pay to become a member.

There are other benefits to being in their network such as group discounts (which I have saved hundreds of dollars using it by the way), but I won’t go into them here. I invite you to check it out for yourself. Just go to StanfordWhosWho.com and click the Enroll button.

They don’t have an affiliate program, but if they did, I would certainly make this offer with a link where I can receive a little kickback if you become a member. However, they don’t but I am happy to recommend them anyway.

12 Responses to Self-Promotion Recommendations

  1. Thank you Joseph for a very balanced blog. I’d signed up with Stanford on a whim after following a link from LinkedIn as you described. In short order I received a very nice certificate and an info pack but in reality I couldn’t really see myself getting any use out of my membership so I decided to cancel it.

    After doing some Googling I found a number of critical comments from supposed former employees etc that declared how hard it had been to get Stanford to cancel memberships without threatening some sort of legal action. Naturally this caused me some concern which grew until I read you blog about how Stanford may be trying to clean up its image. With trepidation I sent an email to Stanford requesting that my membership(an associate membership with a $9 a month charge) be cancelled on its anniversary.

    Literally moments ago I received a cal from one of their employees who was only too happy to cancel my membership and would immediately stop the monthly charges. I’d decided in advance that I wouldn’t ask for my money back as they had actually done everything they promised and it wasn’t their fault that I had joined on a whim so I was prepared to wait out the year and accept the monthly charge. Now I don’t have to.

    All I can say is that my experience with Stanford has been enjoyable and apparently above board. There were no hidden charges and the staff have always been friendly and co-operative. I understand that others may not have been this lucky but I can only speak for myself.

    Like you I am impressed with Stanford.

  2. Wow, talk about deja vu – signed up yesterday, on a whim and with the help of slick salesmanship. Something was ‘nagging’ so have just got onto the net to check them out and am delighted to have landed on your sight. Will give them a fair go. Thanks for sharing.

    • Great. Let me know what you think. I think it’s a pretty awesome service. I have saved a few hundred using their shopping portal and have met some new friends in their network. Pretty good deal I think.

  3. I got a call from a very plausible lady about upselling my registration. Sounded a good offer but she would not send an invoice only wanted by credit card details over the phone. She got upset when I refused. Checked her contact details after – phone number does not exist! SO YOU BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!!

    I reported the scam to Stanford.

    • Tom, there are many companies out there who use a PBX line which has dozens or even hundreds of lines that are not accessible from the outside world. Try reaching someone at Google by using a direct line and you’ll see what I mean. Don’t mistake what you are seeing for a scam. Stanford Who’s Who is not any different than any the yellow pages. It costs money, it might be free if you choose it to be and it might make you a lot of money by allowing people to reach you directly.

  4. Standford contacted me . They gave me the whole sales pitch. I told them i was in an MLM business and was looking for lead contacts for people wanting to earn an extra income on top what they earning currently. I asked if they could help. Of cause i was told. For only $849.00 +$199.00 or $649. + $199.00. I said I was not sure if this will be the correct site for me . The sales woman then said ok how about $369.00 i said no She then said ok how about $99.00. I said no she then said ok $9.00 a month. I asked her again if this is for MLM businesses and she garaunteed me yes it definatly was. I decided not to go with this. Later i spoke to someone who was told the same thing and over the last 6 months she has not made any connects with anyone interested in MLM. I guess they not marketing to the correct type of businesses.

    • If you don’t spend any time on the site, of course, you’re not going to make any connections. I have made contacts with several people and they were receptive to my contact. Can you imagine what experience you would have of Facebook if you didn’t add anyone as friends? I have found that the only people who have complaints about SWW are people who don’t use it. Why don’t you spend a couple days a week or at least as much time as you do on LinkedIn and see if it doesn’t pay off for you. I’m in an MLM, too, but you have to remember that not many people are interested in what you offer unless you have something they can use.

  5. Doing a little research on Stanford’s Who’s Who and found your article. I was just included as a member and it seems a fair enough venue, similar to other networking sites however offering more services for fees with a broader member base and they do offer free listing in their directory. Like most p.r. type sites it’s ultimately how you maximize your own efforts. Glad to find your recommendation. L.A. Lachapelle, Author

  6. Hi, I am from Australia and have just got involved with Stanford Who’s Who and so far I can see the benefit and it is true if you don’t use them you will get nowhere, also I agree that the people that are saying Stanford is a scam in my opinion they did not use them or give it time, I paid no money and was not pushed for any payment.

Leave a reply